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Advances in Hematology
Volume 2010, Article ID 938640, 7 pages
http://dx.doi.org/10.1155/2010/938640
Review Article

𝛽 -Thalassemia: HiJAKing Ineffective Erythropoiesis and Iron Overload

Weill Cornell Medical College, Department of Pediatrics, Division of Hematology-Oncology, 515E 71st street, S702, New York, NY 10021, USA

Received 25 November 2009; Accepted 28 February 2010

Academic Editor: Elizabeta Nemeth

Copyright © 2010 Luca Melchiori et al. This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.

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