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Advances in Materials Science and Engineering
Volume 2017, Article ID 4537039, 8 pages
https://doi.org/10.1155/2017/4537039
Research Article

New Hybrid Materials Synthesized with Different Dyes by Sol-Gel Method

1Faculty of Chemistry, Biology, Geography, West University of Timisoara, 4 Bv. Vasile Parvan, 300223 Timisoara, Romania
2Institute of Chemistry Timisoara of the Romanian Academy, 24 Mihai Viteazul Bvd., 300223 Timisoara, Romania
3Institute of Chemical Research of Catalonia, 16 Av. Paisos Catalans, 43007 Tarragona, Spain

Correspondence should be addressed to Vasile Simulescu; moc.oohay@ucselumisinaig and Gheorghe Ilia; moc.oohay@ailiehg

Received 18 May 2017; Accepted 27 July 2017; Published 28 August 2017

Academic Editor: Renal Backov

Copyright © 2017 Ramona Gheonea et al. This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.

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