Advances in Materials Science and Engineering
 Journal metrics
Acceptance rate29%
Submission to final decision84 days
Acceptance to publication40 days
CiteScore1.370
Impact Factor1.399
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Study on the Heat of Hydration and Strength Development of Cast-In-Situ Foamed Concrete

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 Journal profile

Advances in Materials Science and Engineering publishes research in all areas of materials science and engineering, including the synthesis and properties of materials, and their applications in engineering applications.

 Editor spotlight

Chief Editor, Amit Bandyopadhyay, is based at Washington State University and is interested in  the fields of additive manufacturing or 3D printing of advanced materials. His current research is focused on metal additive manufacturing, biomedical devices and multi‑materials structures.

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We currently have a number of Special Issues open for submission. Special Issues highlight emerging areas of research within a field, or provide a venue for a deeper investigation into an existing research area.

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Research Article

Behavior of Lime-Stabilized Red Bed Soil after Cyclic Wetting-Drying in Triaxial Tests and SEM Analysis

Most red beds demonstrate inferior geotechnical properties in natural conditions and need to be improved when used as construction material. In this study, a serious of triaxial tests, permeability tests, and scanning electron microscopy (SEM) analysis were carried out on lime-stabilized and untreated red bed soil after experiencing different wetting-drying (W-D) cycles. The test results showed that, with the increase in the added lime, the shear strength, strength parameters (including the cohesion and the internal friction angle), and the shear modulus of red bed soil increased gradually. For the untreated specimens, the four parameters decreased considerably after experiencing W-D cycles, while for the lime-stabilized specimens, they generally increased with an increase in the W-D cycles. Without experiencing the W-D cycles, the permeability coefficient increased by two times after it was stabilized with 10% lime. But with an increase in the W-D cycles, the permeability coefficient of the untreated and lime-stabilized specimens continuously increased and significantly decreased, respectively. Finally, variations in microstructure of the red bed soil under the effects of the lime stabilization and W-D cycles were discussed based on the SEM analysis. The results may contribute to improvement of red bed soil when used as roadbed and airfield fillings.

Research Article

Zigzag Dissociation Mode of 〈c + a〉 Dislocations on the Plane in Magnesium Alloys

Fundamental understanding of the dissociation mode of 〈c + a〉 dislocations on the plane is required before the goal of improving the ductility of Mg alloys attained. In this study, our density-functional theory calculations reveal that the atoms in the plane slip along a zigzag trace through a low-energy pathway. We thus propose a novel zigzag dissociation mode based on this slip trace. In particular, the shuffling motion of atoms is observed at the position of stable stacking fault, which is closely related to the c/a ratio of the hexagonal closed-packed lattices.

Research Article

Evaluating the Effect of Calcination and Grinding of Corn Stalk Ash on Pozzolanic Potential for Sustainable Cement-Based Materials

In developing countries, one of the usual practices is the uncontrolled, open burning of corn stalk (CS) or its utilization as a fuel. It is known that the ash obtained under uncontrolled burning conditions constitutes blackish and unburnt carbon particles as well as whitish and grayish particles (representing crystallization of silica) due to over burning. However, controlling the burning process can improve the quality of ash produced to effectively use it in cement-based materials. Hence, this research was aimed at exploring the pozzolanic properties of corn stalk ash upon calcination and grinding, for it to be used in the manufacturing of sustainable cement-based materials. In order to obtain a suitable corn stalk ash (CSA), which can be used in cement/concrete, a research investigation consisted of two phases. In the first phase, calcination was carried out at 400°C, 500°C, 600°C, 700°C, and 800°C for 2 hours. The tests applied on the resulting ashes were weight loss, XRD, pozzolanic activity index (PAI), Chapelle, Fratini, and consistency. From XRD spectra, it was found that, at lower temperatures, silica remained amorphous, while it crystallized at higher temperature. Ash combusted at a temperature of 500°C possessed largest pozzolanic activity of 96.8%, had a Fratini CaO reduction of 93.2%, and Chapelle activity of 856.3 mg/g. Thus, 500°C was chosen as an optimum calcination temperature. In the second phase, the ash produced at 500°C was grinded for durations of 30, 60, 120, and 240 minutes to ascertain the optimum grinding times. Resulting ashes were examined for hydrometer analysis, Blaine fineness, Chapelle activity, and pozzolanic activity. Experiment outcomes revealed a direct relationship between values of Blaine fineness, surface area, Chapelle activity, PAI, and grinding duration. It was concluded that CSA can be used as a pozzolan, and thus, its utilization in cement/concrete would solve ash disposal problems and aid in production of eco-friendly cement/concrete.

Research Article

Microstructure and Properties of a 2.25Cr1Mo0.25V Heat-Resistant Steel Produced by Wire Arc Additive Manufacturing

Wire arc additive manufacturing (WAAM) technology was used to produce samples of a 2.25Cr1Mo0.25V heat-resistant steel. The phase composition, microstructure, and crystal structure of the investigated material in the as-cladded state and postcladding heat-treated (705°C × 1 h) state were analysed by optical emission spectrometry (OES), optical microscopy, scanning electron microscopy (SEM), and transmission electron microscopy (TEM). The properties of the investigated material in the as-cladded state and postcladding heat-treated (705°C × 1 h) state were determined by a microhardness tester, mechanical properties tester, and Charpy impact tester. Through a study of the microstructure and properties, it is found that the investigated material produced by WAAM exhibits good forming quality and excellent metallurgical bonding properties, and no obvious defects are found. The microstructure consists mainly of Bg (granular bainite) and troostite precipitated at the grain boundaries. The results from high-resolution transmission electron microscopy observations show that the crystal structures of the 2.25Cr1Mo0.25V heat-resistant steel samples produced by WAAM in the as-cladded condition have many defects, such as dislocations and martensite-austenite (M-A) constituents, and their grain edges are sharp. There is a dramatic decrease in the dislocations in the 2.25Cr1Mo0.25V heat-resistant steel samples produced by the WAAM condition after the postcladding heat treatment (705°C × 1 h), and the grains become smooth. The distribution of the microhardness in the longitudinal and transverse cross sections of the samples is very uniform. The average longitudinal and transverse microhardness of the samples in the as-cladded state is 310 HV0.5 and 324 HV0.5, respectively. The average longitudinal and transverse microhardness of the samples after post-cladding heat treatment is 227 HV0.5 and 229 HV0.5, respectively. The yield strength of the samples without a postcladding heat treatment is 743 MPa, the tensile strength is 951 MPa, the elongation is 10%, and the Charpy impact value at -20°C is 15 J. After the postcladding heat treatment, the yield strength, tensile strength, elongation, and Charpy impact value of the samples are 611 MPa, 704 MPa, 14.5%, and 70 J, respectively.

Research Article

Mechanical and Electroconductivity Properties of Graphite Tailings Concrete

This paper investigated the mechanical and electroconductivity properties of graphite tailings concrete, in which the graphite tailings are replaced as sand. The results showed that the concentration of graphite tailings has an important influence on the mechanical, electroconductivity, and material properties of concrete. Finally, a new model for calculating the relationship between compressive strength and electrical resistivity based on the grey correlation method was obtained for providing a theoretical basis for building green and intelligent building materials.

Research Article

Cold Recycled Asphalt Mixture using 100% RAP with Emulsified Asphalt-Recycling Agent as a New Pavement Base Course

The rehabilitation process of asphalt pavements using the technique of milling and filling can cause several environmental problems due to either the disposal of the milled asphalt mix or the exploration of natural resources. One alternative to mitigate these impacts is to reuse this milled material, known as reclaimed asphalt pavement (RAP), in the construction of new pavement layers. Within the several available techniques to reuse the RAP, cold recycling using an emulsified asphalt-recycling agent has shown great potential. The aim of this study is to evaluate the application of a cold recycled asphalt mix using 100% RAP with an emulsified asphalt-recycling agent as a new pavement base course. A trial section was built employing this material as a pavement base course in a heavy traffic highway in Brazil, and its structural behavior was monitored for 12 months using a Falling Weight Deflectometer (FWD) to assess its performance over time. Furthermore, a laboratory-testing program was performed to evaluate the recycled mixture stiffness and strength through resilient modulus and indirect tensile strength tests. These tests were used to investigate the influence of the storage interval (7, 14, and 28 days) considering the time between mixing and compaction of the mixture. The effect of the curing time after compaction (1, 3, 7, 26, and 56 days) was also assessed. It was verified in laboratory and in the trial section that the stiffness increases with curing time. Furthermore, the backcalculated elastic resilient moduli indicated values in the same order of magnitude to those obtained in the laboratory tests. In addition to the laboratory test findings, it was also observed that the longer the period of storage, the higher the values of stiffness and tensile strength for short periods of curing. This behavior was not verified when longer curing periods were used. In general, the use of cold recycled asphalt mixtures as base course of new pavements proved to be a promising alternative to reuse RAP.

Advances in Materials Science and Engineering
 Journal metrics
Acceptance rate29%
Submission to final decision84 days
Acceptance to publication40 days
CiteScore1.370
Impact Factor1.399
 Submit

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