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Advances in Materials Science and Engineering
Volume 2017 (2017), Article ID 5634713, 17 pages
https://doi.org/10.1155/2017/5634713
Research Article

The Combined Effect of the Initial Cure and the Type of Cement on the Natural Carbonation, the Portlandite Content, and Nonevaporable Water in Blended Cement

1Geo Materials Development Laboratory, Technology Faculty, Department of Civil Engineering, M’sila University, P.O. Box 166, Ichbilia, 28000 Msila, Algeria
2Materials and Electronic Systems Laboratory (LMSE), Faculty of Science and Technology, Bachir El Ibrahimi University of Bordj Bou Arréridj, 34260 Bordj Bou Arréridj, Algeria
3Research Center & Technology Services Industry Building Materials, CETIM, P.O. Box 7, Cité Ibn Khaldoun, 35000 Boumerdès, Algeria
4Materials and Mechanics of Structures Laboratory (LMMS), Technology Faculty, Department of Civil Engineering, M’sila University, P.O. Box 166, Ichbilia, 28000 M’sila, Algeria

Correspondence should be addressed to Saida Boualleg

Received 20 January 2017; Accepted 28 February 2017; Published 29 March 2017

Academic Editor: Xiao-Yong Wang

Copyright © 2017 Saida Boualleg et al. This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.

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