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Advances in Tribology
Volume 2013, Article ID 165859, 9 pages
http://dx.doi.org/10.1155/2013/165859
Research Article

Optimization of Tribological Properties of Nonasbestos Brake Pad Material by Using Steel Wool

1GKM College of Engineering and Technology, Chennai, Tamil Nadu 600063, India
2Sree Sastha Institute of Engineering and Technology, Chennai, Tamil Nadu 600123, India

Received 26 May 2013; Accepted 29 August 2013

Academic Editor: Huseyin Çimenoǧlu

Copyright © 2013 R. Vijay et al. This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.

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