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Journal of Biomedicine and Biotechnology
Volume 2006, Article ID 32713, 8 pages
http://dx.doi.org/10.1155/JBB/2006/32713
Review Article

The Potential Regulation of L1 Mobility by RNA Interference

1Department of Pathology and Laboratory Medicine, School of Medicine, University of Pennsylvania, Philadelphia, PA 19104-6055, USA
2Friedrich Miescher Institute for Biomedical Research, Maulbeerstrasse 66, Basel 4058, Switzerland

Received 6 August 2005; Revised 12 December 2005; Accepted 20 December 2005

Copyright © 2006 Shane R. Horman et al. This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.

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