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Journal of Biomedicine and Biotechnology
Volume 2006, Article ID 37285, 8 pages
http://dx.doi.org/10.1155/JBB/2006/37285
Review Article

DNA Damage and L1 Retrotransposition

1Department of Pathology and Laboratory Medicine, School of Medicine, University of Pennsylvania, Philadelphia, PA 19104, USA
2405B Stellar Chance Labs, University of Pennsylvania, 422 Curie Boulevard, Philadelphia, PA 19104, USA

Received 22 August 2005; Accepted 16 October 2005

Copyright © 2006 Evan A. Farkash and Eline T. Luning Prak. This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.

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