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Journal of Biomedicine and Biotechnology
Volume 2010, Article ID 202918, 9 pages
http://dx.doi.org/10.1155/2010/202918
Research Article

Features of Recent Codon Evolution: A Comparative Polymorphism-Fixation Study

1Department of Biomedical Informatics, Vanderbilt University School of Medicine, Nashville, TN 37232, USA
2Department of Psychiatry, Vanderbilt University School of Medicine, Nashville, TN 37232, USA
3Bioinformatics Resource Center, Vanderbilt-Ingram Cancer Center, Vanderbilt University, Nashville, TN 37203, USA
4Virginia Institute for Psychiatric and Behavioral Genetics, Virginia Commonwealth University, Richmond, VA 23298, USA

Received 14 March 2010; Accepted 31 March 2010

Academic Editor: Momiao Xiong

Copyright © 2010 Zhongming Zhao and Cizhong Jiang. This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.

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