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Journal of Biomedicine and Biotechnology
Volume 2010, Article ID 386545, 13 pages
http://dx.doi.org/10.1155/2010/386545
Research Article

Cell Density Plays a Critical Role in Ex Vivo Expansion of T Cells for Adoptive Immunotherapy

1Biotherapeutics Development Laboratory, Roger Williams Medical Center, Boston University School of Medicine, Providence, RI 02908, USA
2Beth Israel Deaconess Medical Center, Harvard Medical School, Boston, MA 02115, USA

Received 24 December 2009; Revised 5 April 2010; Accepted 6 May 2010

Academic Editor: Zhengguo Xiao

Copyright © 2010 Qiangzhong Ma et al. This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.

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