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Journal of Biomedicine and Biotechnology
Volume 2010, Article ID 484987, 6 pages
http://dx.doi.org/10.1155/2010/484987
Review Article

Endocytosis and Recycling of Tight Junction Proteins in Inflammation

Department of General and Visceral Surgery, University Hospital Muenster, Waldeyerstraße 1, 48149 Muenster, Germany

Received 19 July 2009; Accepted 28 October 2009

Academic Editor: Xue-Ru Wu

Copyright © 2010 Markus Utech et al. This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.

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