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Journal of Biomedicine and Biotechnology
Volume 2010, Article ID 705215, 15 pages
http://dx.doi.org/10.1155/2010/705215
Review Article

Induction/Engineering, Detection, Selection, and Expansion of Clinical-Grade Human Antigen-Specific Cytotoxic T Cell Clones for Adoptive Immunotherapy

1Tissue Typing Center, Blood Transfusion Centre of Slovenia, Šlajmerjeva 6, 1000 Ljubljana, Slovenia
2Cell Engineering Laboratory, Celica, Biomedical Center, Technology Park 24, 1000 Ljubljana, Slovenia
3Laboratory of Neuroendocrinology-Molecular Cell Physiology, Institute of Pathophysiology, Faculty of Medicine, University of Ljubljana, Zaloška 4, 1000 Ljubljana, Slovenia

Received 5 December 2009; Accepted 28 January 2010

Academic Editor: Zhengguo Xiao

Copyright © 2010 Matjaž Jeras et al. This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.

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