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Journal of Biomedicine and Biotechnology
Volume 2010, Article ID 974943, 9 pages
http://dx.doi.org/10.1155/2010/974943
Review Article

Interaction of Botulinum Toxin with the Epithelial Barrier

Laboratory for Infection Cell Biology, International Research Center for Infectious Diseases, Research Institute for Microbial Diseases, Osaka University, Yamada-oka 3-1, Suita, Osaka 565-0871, Japan

Received 10 August 2009; Accepted 24 December 2009

Academic Editor: Karl Chai

Copyright © 2010 Yukako Fujinaga. This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.

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