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Journal of Biomedicine and Biotechnology
Volume 2011, Article ID 148201, 2 pages
http://dx.doi.org/10.1155/2011/148201
Editorial

Protein Acetylation and the Physiological Role of HDACs

1Friedrich Miescher Institute for Biomedical Research, 4002 Basel, Switzerland
2Medical University Vienna, 1030 Vienna, Austria
3RIKEN Advanced Science Institute, Saitama 351-0198, Japan

Received 16 October 2011; Accepted 16 October 2011

Copyright © 2011 Patrick Matthias et al. This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.

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