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Journal of Biomedicine and Biotechnology
Volume 2011 (2011), Article ID 258185, 17 pages
http://dx.doi.org/10.1155/2011/258185
Review Article

Mouse Models of Escherichia coli O157:H7 Infection and Shiga Toxin Injection

Department of Microbiology and Immunology, Uniformed Services University of the Health Sciences, 4301 Jones Bridge Road, Bethesda, MD 20814, USA

Received 10 September 2010; Accepted 3 November 2010

Academic Editor: Oreste Gualillo

Copyright © 2011 Krystle L. Mohawk and Alison D. O'Brien. This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.

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