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Journal of Biomedicine and Biotechnology
Volume 2011, Article ID 348765, 11 pages
http://dx.doi.org/10.1155/2011/348765
Review Article

Genetic Rodent Models of Amyotrophic Lateral Sclerosis

Neurobiology, Vesalius Research Center, K.U. Leuven and VIB, Campus Gasthuisberg O&N2 PB1022, Herestraat 49, 3000 Leuven, Belgium

Received 15 September 2010; Accepted 29 November 2010

Academic Editor: Oreste Gualillo

Copyright © 2011 L. Van Den Bosch. This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.

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