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Journal of Biomedicine and Biotechnology
Volume 2011 (2011), Article ID 473097, 10 pages
http://dx.doi.org/10.1155/2011/473097
Review Article

Role of Natural Killer and Dendritic Cell Crosstalk in Immunomodulation by Commensal Bacteria Probiotics

1Laboratory of Immunology and Biotherapy, Department of Human Pathology, University of Messina, 98125 Messina, Italy
2Department of Systems Biology, Technical University of Denmark, 2800 Lyngby, Denmark

Received 17 February 2011; Accepted 1 March 2011

Academic Editor: Roberto Biassoni

Copyright © 2011 Valeria Rizzello et al. This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.

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