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Journal of Biomedicine and Biotechnology
Volume 2011, Article ID 798052, 8 pages
http://dx.doi.org/10.1155/2011/798052
Research Article

Influence of Hsp90 and HDAC Inhibition and Tubulin Acetylation on Perinuclear Protein Aggregation in Human Retinal Pigment Epithelial Cells

1Department of Ophthalmology, University of Eastern Finland, 70211 Kuopio, Finland
2Department of Ophthalmology, University of Tampere, 33014 Tampere, Finland
3Department of Neuroscience and Neurology, University of Eastern Finland, 70211 Kuopio, Finland
4Department of Neurology, Kuopio University Hospital, 70211 Kuopio, Finland
5Department of Ophthalmology, Kuopio University Hospital, 70211 Kuopio, Finland

Received 16 June 2010; Accepted 23 September 2010

Academic Editor: Patrick Matthias

Copyright © 2011 Tuomas Ryhänen et al. This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.

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