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Journal of Biomedicine and Biotechnology
Volume 2011 (2011), Article ID 970382, 15 pages
http://dx.doi.org/10.1155/2011/970382
Review Article

The Tale of Protein Lysine Acetylation in the Cytoplasm

1INSERM, U823, Institut Albert Bonniot, Université Joseph Fourier Grenoble 1, 38700 Grenoble, France
2State Key Laboratory of Medical Genomics, Department of Hematology, Ruijin Hospital, Shanghai Institute of Hematology, Shanghai Jiao Tong University School of Medicine, Shanghai 200025, China

Received 20 July 2010; Accepted 29 September 2010

Academic Editor: Patrick Matthias

Copyright © 2011 Karin Sadoul et al. This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.

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