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Journal of Biomedicine and Biotechnology
Volume 2012, Article ID 681016, 9 pages
http://dx.doi.org/10.1155/2012/681016
Research Article

Dietary Mercury Exposure Resulted in Behavioral Differences in Mice Contaminated with Fish-Associated Methylmercury Compared to Methylmercury Chloride Added to Diet

1Bordeaux University-CNRS, UMR EPOC 5805, Arcachon Marine Station, place du Docteur Peyneau, 33120 Arcachon, France
2Pathology Section, Department of Basic Medical Sciences, National Institute for Minamata Disease, 4058-18 Hama, Minamata, Kumamoto 867-0008, Japan

Received 16 April 2012; Revised 12 June 2012; Accepted 19 June 2012

Academic Editor: João B.T. Rocha

Copyright © 2012 Jean-Paul Bourdineaud et al. This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.

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