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Journal of Biomedicine and Biotechnology
Volume 2012, Article ID 691641, 11 pages
http://dx.doi.org/10.1155/2012/691641
Research Article

Profiling of Age-Related Changes in the Tibialis Anterior Muscle Proteome of the mdx Mouse Model of Dystrophinopathy

1Department of Biology, National University of Ireland, Maynooth, Co. Kildare, Ireland
2Department of Physiology II, University of Bonn, 53115 Bonn, Germany

Received 2 May 2012; Accepted 13 June 2012

Academic Editor: Ayman El-Kadi

Copyright © 2012 Steven Carberry et al. This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.

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