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Journal of Biomedicine and Biotechnology
Volume 2012, Article ID 949048, 11 pages
http://dx.doi.org/10.1155/2012/949048
Review Article

Toxic Effects of Mercury on the Cardiovascular and Central Nervous Systems

1Programa de Pós-Graduação em Ciências Fisiológicas, Universidade Federal do Espírito Santo, 29042-755 Vitória, ES, Brazil
2Curso de Fisioterapia, Universidade Federal do Pampa, 97050-460 Uruguaiana, RS, Brazil
3Programa de Pós-Graduação em Bioquímica, Universidade Federal do Pampa, 97050-460 Uruguaiana, RS, Brazil
4Hospital Universitário Cassiano Antônio de Morais, Universidade Federal do Espírito Santo, 29040-091 Vitória, ES, Brazil
5Departamento de Enfermagem, Universidade Federal do Espírito Santo, 29040-090 Vitória, ES, Brazil
6Departamento de Fisiologia e Biofísica, Universidade de São Paulo, 05508-900 São Paulo, SP, Brazil
7Departamento de Fisiologia, Universidad Rey Juan Carlos, 28922 Alcorcón, Spain
8Departamento de Farmacología, Universidad Autónoma de Madrid, 28029 Madrid, Spain
9Escola Superior de Ciências da Santa Casa de Misericórdia de Vitória, EMESCAM, 29045-402 Vitória, ES, Brazil

Received 3 April 2012; Accepted 15 May 2012

Academic Editor: Marcelo Farina

Copyright © 2012 Bruna Fernandes Azevedo et al. This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.

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