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BioMed Research International
Volume 2013, Article ID 705741, 10 pages
http://dx.doi.org/10.1155/2013/705741
Review Article

Bacteriophages Infecting Propionibacterium acnes

1Department of Biomedicine, Aarhus University, 8000 Aarhus C, Denmark
2Laboratory of Bacterial Pathogenesis and Immunology, The Rockefeller University, 1230 York Avenue, New York, NY 10065, USA

Received 3 January 2013; Revised 12 March 2013; Accepted 21 March 2013

Academic Editor: Andrew McDowell

Copyright © 2013 Holger Brüggemann and Rolf Lood. This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.

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