Table of Contents Author Guidelines Submit a Manuscript
BioMed Research International
Volume 2014, Article ID 129796, 7 pages
http://dx.doi.org/10.1155/2014/129796
Research Article

Predictors of Memory and Processing Speed Dysfunctions after Traumatic Brain Injury

1School of Medicine, Poznan University, 61-701 Poznan, Poland
2Department of Neurosurgery, University of Virginia Health System, Charlottesville, VA 22908, USA
3Department of Surgery, Faculty of Medicine, College of Medicine, Kaohsiung Medical University, Kaohsiung City 807, Taiwan
4Department of Neurosurgery, Kaohsiung Medical University Hospital, Kaohsiung City 807, Taiwan
5Department of Neurosurgery, University of Virginia, Charlottesville, VA 22908, USA
6College of Medicine, Kaohsiung Medical University Hospital, Kaohsiung City 807, Taiwan
7Department of Neurosurgery, University of Virginia Health System, Charlottesville, VA 22908, USA
8Department of Occupational Therapy, College of Health Sciences, Kaohsiung Medical University, Kaohsiung City 807, Taiwan

Received 7 February 2014; Accepted 17 March 2014; Published 29 April 2014

Academic Editor: Hung-Chen Wang

Copyright © 2014 William Winardi et al. This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.

Abstract

Background. The aims of this study were to evaluate the predictive value of admission Glasgow Coma Scale (GCS) scores, duration of unconsciousness, neurosurgical intervention, and countercoup lesion on the impairment of memory and processing speed functions six months after a traumatic brain injury (TBI) based on a structural equation modeling. Methods. Thirty TBI patients recruited from Neurosurgical Department at the Kaohsiung Medical University Hospital were administered the Wechsler Memory Scale-III (WMS-III) and the Wechsler Adult Intelligence Scale-III processing speed index to evaluate the memory and processing speed functions. Results. The study showed that GCS scores accounted for 40% of the variance in memory/processing speed. No significant predictive effects were found for the other three variables. GCS classification at the time of TBI seems to correspond moderately to the severity of memory/processing speed dysfunctions. Conclusions. The present study demonstrated that admission GCS score is a robust predictor of memory/processing speed dysfunctions after TBI. The results should be replicated with a large sample of patients with TBI, or be extended by examining other potential clinical predictors.