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BioMed Research International
Volume 2014, Article ID 136419, 14 pages
http://dx.doi.org/10.1155/2014/136419
Review Article

Comparative Evaluation of Recombinant Protein Production in Different Biofactories: The Green Perspective

Department of Biotechnology, University of Verona, 37134 Verona, Italy

Received 6 December 2013; Accepted 10 February 2014; Published 12 March 2014

Academic Editor: Luca Santi

Copyright © 2014 Matilde Merlin et al. This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.

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