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BioMed Research International
Volume 2014, Article ID 198153, 7 pages
http://dx.doi.org/10.1155/2014/198153
Research Article

Cortical Electrophysiological Markers of Language Abilities in Children with Hearing Aids: A Pilot Study

1CHRU de Tours, Service ORL et Chirurgie Cervico-Faciale, boulevard Tonnellé, 37044 Tours, France
2INSERM U930, 37044 Tours, France
3Université François-Rabelais de Tours, CHRU de Tours, UMR-S930, 37044 Tours, France
4Laboratoire de Psycholinguistique Expérimentale, Faculté de Psychologie et des Sciences de l’Education, Université de Genève, 40 boulevard du pont d’Arve, 1211 Genève 4, Switzerland
5Department of Head and Neck Surgery, David Geffen School of Medicine, UCLA, Los Angeles, CA 90095, USA
6CHRU de Tours, Service de Pédopsychiatrie, boulevard Tonnellé, 37044 Tours, France

Received 28 February 2014; Revised 30 June 2014; Accepted 28 July 2014; Published 19 August 2014

Academic Editor: Ramesh Rajan

Copyright © 2014 David Bakhos et al. This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.

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