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BioMed Research International
Volume 2014, Article ID 274507, 11 pages
http://dx.doi.org/10.1155/2014/274507
Research Article

Potential Role of A2B Adenosine Receptors on Proliferation/Migration of Fetal Endothelium Derived from Preeclamptic Pregnancies

1Vascular Physiology Laboratory, Group of Investigation in Tumor Angiogenesis (GIANT), Group of Research and Innovation in Vascular Health (GRIVAS Health), Department of Basic Sciences, Faculty of Sciences, Universidad del Bío-Bío, Chillán, Chile
2Obstetrics and Gynecology Department, Herminda Martin Clinical Hospital, Chillan, Chile
3University of Queensland Centre for Clinical Research (UQCCR), Faculty of Medicine and Biomedical Sciences, University of Queensland, Herston, QLD 4006, Australia
4Department of Clinical Biochemistry and Immunology, Faculty of Pharmacy, University of Concepción, Chile
5Cellular and Molecular Physiology Laboratory (CMPL), Division of Obstetrics and Gynecology, Faculty of Medicine, School of Medicine, Pontificia Universidad Católica de Chile, Santiago, Chile

Received 13 December 2013; Accepted 1 April 2014; Published 28 April 2014

Academic Editor: Gregory Rice

Copyright © 2014 Jesenia Acurio et al. This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.

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