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BioMed Research International
Volume 2014 (2014), Article ID 318714, 8 pages
http://dx.doi.org/10.1155/2014/318714
Review Article

ROS, Notch, and Wnt Signaling Pathways: Crosstalk between Three Major Regulators of Cardiovascular Biology

1Department of Cardiology and Laboratory for Technologies of Advanced Therapies (LTTA Center), University Hospital of Ferrara and Maria Cecilia Hospital, GVM Care & Research, E.S. Health Science Foundation, Cotignola, Italy
2Centro Cardiologico Monzino (IRCCS), Laboratorio di Biologia Vascolare e Medicina Rigenerativa, Milan, Italy

Received 17 November 2013; Accepted 28 December 2013; Published 4 February 2014

Academic Editor: Tullia Maraldi

Copyright © 2014 C. Caliceti et al. This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.

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