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BioMed Research International
Volume 2014, Article ID 418975, 14 pages
http://dx.doi.org/10.1155/2014/418975
Review Article

Maternal Obesity, Inflammation, and Developmental Programming

Liggins Institute and Gravida, National Centre for Growth and Development, University of Auckland, Auckland 1142, New Zealand

Received 14 March 2014; Accepted 30 April 2014; Published 20 May 2014

Academic Editor: Luis Sobrevia

Copyright © 2014 Stephanie A. Segovia et al. This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.

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