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BioMed Research International
Volume 2014, Article ID 735672, 9 pages
http://dx.doi.org/10.1155/2014/735672
Review Article

mTOR in Viral Hepatitis and Hepatocellular Carcinoma: Function and Treatment

Department of Medical Oncology, Institute of Clinical Science, Sir Runrun Shaw Hospital, School of Medicine, Zhejiang University, Hangzhou, China

Received 8 November 2013; Accepted 7 March 2014; Published 2 April 2014

Academic Editor: Qing He

Copyright © 2014 Zhuo Wang et al. This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.

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