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BioMed Research International
Volume 2014 (2014), Article ID 767812, 11 pages
http://dx.doi.org/10.1155/2014/767812
Research Article

Cardiac Phosphoproteomics during Remote Ischemic Preconditioning: A Role for the Sarcomeric Z-Disk Proteins

1Bristol Heart Institute & School of Clinical Sciences, Faculty of Medicine & Dentistry, University of Bristol, Bristol Royal Infirmary, Level 7, Marlborough Street, Bristol BS2 8HW, UK
2The Proteomics Facility, Medical Sciences Building, University Walk, Bristol BS8 1TD, UK

Received 17 January 2014; Revised 20 February 2014; Accepted 21 February 2014; Published 30 March 2014

Academic Editor: Anthony Gramolin

Copyright © 2014 Safa Abdul-Ghani et al. This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.

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