Table of Contents Author Guidelines Submit a Manuscript
BioMed Research International
Volume 2014, Article ID 937050, 3 pages
http://dx.doi.org/10.1155/2014/937050
Editorial

Diseases of Pregnancy and Fetal Programming: Cell and Molecular Mechanisms

1Cellular and Molecular Physiology Laboratory (CMPL), Division of Obstetrics and Gynaecology, School of Medicine, Faculty of Medicine, Pontificia Universidad Católica de Chile, P.O. Box 114-D, Santiago 8330024, Chile
2University of Queensland Centre for Clinical Research (UQCCR), Faculty of Medicine and Biomedical Sciences, University of Queensland, Herston, QLD 4029, Australia
3Department of Physiology, Faculty of Pharmacy, Universidad de Sevilla, Seville E-41012, Spain
4Center for Pregnancy and Newborn Research, University of Texas Health Science Center San Antonio, San Antonio, TX 78229-3900, USA

Received 17 September 2014; Accepted 17 September 2014; Published 10 November 2014

Copyright © 2014 Luis Sobrevia et al. This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.

Linked References

  1. P. D. Gluckman, M. A. Hanson, C. Cooper, and K. L. Thornburg, “Effect of in utero and early-life conditions on adult health and disease,” The New England Journal of Medicine, vol. 359, no. 1, pp. 61–73, 2008. View at Publisher · View at Google Scholar · View at Scopus
  2. A. Leiva, F. Pardo, M. A. Ramírez, M. Farías, P. Casanello, and L. Sobrevia, “Fetoplacental vascular endothelial dysfunction as an early phenomenon in the programming of human adult diseases in subjects born from gestational diabetes mellitus or obesity in pregnancy,” Experimental Diabetes Research, vol. 2011, Article ID 349286, 18 pages, 2011. View at Publisher · View at Google Scholar · View at Scopus
  3. J. A. Grieger, L. E. Grzeskowiak, and V. L. Clifton, “Preconception dietary patterns in human pregnancies are associated with preterm delivery,” Journal of Nutrition, vol. 144, pp. 1075–1080, 2014. View at Publisher · View at Google Scholar
  4. E. Forno, O. M. Young, R. Kumar, H. Simhan, and J. C. Celedón, “Maternal obesity in pregnancy, gestational weight gain, and risk of childhood asthma,” Pediatrics, vol. 134, no. 2, pp. e535–e546, 2014. View at Publisher · View at Google Scholar
  5. E. Guzmán-Gutiérrez, P. Arroyo, R. Salsoso et al., “Role of insulin and adenosine in the human placenta microvascular and macrovascular endothelial cell dysfunction in GDM,” Microcirculation, vol. 21, no. 1, pp. 26–37, 2014. View at Publisher · View at Google Scholar · View at Scopus
  6. E. Guzmán-Gutiérrez, F. Westermeier, C. Salomón et al., “Insulin-increased L-arginine transport requires A2A adenosine receptors activation in human umbilical vein endothelium,” PLoS ONE, vol. 7, no. 7, Article ID e41705, 2012. View at Publisher · View at Google Scholar · View at Scopus
  7. J. Espinoza, A. F. Espinoza, and G. G. Power, “High fetal plasma adenosine concentration: a role for the fetus in preeclampsia?” American Journal of Obstetrics & Gynecology, vol. 205, no. 5, pp. 485.e24–485.e27, 2011. View at Publisher · View at Google Scholar · View at Scopus
  8. C. Escudero and L. Sobrevia, “Adenosine plasma levels in the fetoplacental circulation in preeclampsia,” The American Journal of Obstetrics and Gynecology, vol. 206, no. 4, article e6, 2012. View at Publisher · View at Google Scholar · View at Scopus
  9. F. Westermeier, C. Salomón, M. Farías et al., “Insulin requires normal expression and signalling of insulin receptor a to reverse gestational diabetes-reduced adenosine transport in human umbilical vein endothelium,” The FASEB Journal, vol. 29, 2015. View at Google Scholar
  10. C. Salomón, F. Westermeier, C. Puebla et al., “Gestational diabetes reduces adenosine transport in human placental microvascular endothelium, an effect reversed by insulin,” PLoS ONE, vol. 7, no. 7, Article ID e40578, 2012. View at Publisher · View at Google Scholar · View at Scopus