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BioMed Research International
Volume 2014 (2014), Article ID 952128, 8 pages
http://dx.doi.org/10.1155/2014/952128
Review Article

Interleukin-13 Receptor Alpha 2-Targeted Glioblastoma Immunotherapy

1Roger Williams Medical Center Brain Tumor Laboratory, 825 Chalkstone Avenue, Prior 222, Providence, RI 02908, USA
2Department of Neurosurgery, Boston University School of Medicine, Boston, MA 02118, USA
3University of Illinois College of Medicine, Urbana-Champaign, IL 61801, USA

Received 3 April 2014; Accepted 5 August 2014; Published 27 August 2014

Academic Editor: Gustavo Pradilla

Copyright © 2014 Sadhak Sengupta et al. This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.

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