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BioMed Research International
Volume 2014, Article ID 982121, 11 pages
http://dx.doi.org/10.1155/2014/982121
Research Article

Remote Dose-Dependent Effects of Dry Needling at Distant Myofascial Trigger Spots of Rabbit Skeletal Muscles on Reduction of Substance P Levels of Proximal Muscle and Spinal Cords

1Department of Physical Therapy, Graduate Institute of Rehabilitation Science, China Medical University, Taichung 40402, Taiwan
2Department of Physical Medicine and Rehabilitation, Cheng Ching General Hospital, Taichung 40407, Taiwan
3School of Chinese Medicine, College of Chinese Medicine, China Medical University, Taichung 40402, Taiwan
4Department of Physical Medicine and Rehabilitation, China Medical University Hospital, Taichung 40402, Taiwan
5Research Center for Chinese Medicine and Acupuncture, China Medical University, Taichung 40402, Taiwan
6Department of Physical Therapy, Hungkuang University, Taichung 43302, Taiwan

Received 13 February 2014; Accepted 15 August 2014; Published 3 September 2014

Academic Editor: Katarzyna Starowicz

Copyright © 2014 Yueh-Ling Hsieh et al. This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.

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