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BioMed Research International
Volume 2014 (2014), Article ID 985813, 10 pages
http://dx.doi.org/10.1155/2014/985813
Review Article

The Endothelium, A Protagonist in the Pathophysiology of Critical Illness: Focus on Cellular Markers

1Department of Critical Care Medicine, Antwerp University Hospital (UZA), University of Antwerp (UA), Wilrijkstraat 10, 2650 Edegem, Belgium
2Department of Internal Medicine, Antwerp University Hospital (UZA) and University of Antwerp (UA), Wilrijkstraat 10, 2650 Edegem, Belgium
3Laboratory of Cellular and Molecular Cardiology, Antwerp University Hospital (UZA), University of Antwerp (UA), Wilrijkstraat 10, 2650 Edegem, Belgium
4Department of Cardiology, Antwerp University Hospital (UZA), University of Antwerp (UA), Wilrijkstraat 10, 2650 Edegem, Belgium

Received 5 November 2013; Revised 18 February 2014; Accepted 4 March 2014; Published 1 April 2014

Academic Editor: Iveta Bernatova

Copyright © 2014 Sabrina H. van Ierssel et al. This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.

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