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BioMed Research International
Volume 2015 (2015), Article ID 123484, 23 pages
http://dx.doi.org/10.1155/2015/123484
Review Article

Environmental Impact on DNA Methylation in the Germline: State of the Art and Gaps of Knowledge

Laboratory of Toxicology, Technical Unit of Radiation Biology and Human Health, CR Casaccia, ENEA, Via Anguillarese 301, 00123 Rome, Italy

Received 14 January 2015; Accepted 3 May 2015

Academic Editor: Heide Schatten

Copyright © 2015 Francesca Pacchierotti and Marcello Spanò. This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.

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