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BioMed Research International
Volume 2015 (2015), Article ID 184845, 9 pages
http://dx.doi.org/10.1155/2015/184845
Review Article

Preimplantation Exposure to Bisphenol A and Triclosan May Lead to Implantation Failure in Humans

1Department of Reproductive Endocrinology, Women’s Hospital, School of Medicine, Zhejiang University, 1 Xueshi Road, Hangzhou 310006, China
2Department of Obstetrics and Gynecology, Shanghai First People’s Hospital, Shanghai Jiaotong University, Shanghai 201600, China
3School of Medicine, University of Wollongong and Illawarra Health and Medical Research Institute, Wollongong, NSW 2522, Australia

Received 19 February 2015; Revised 21 June 2015; Accepted 25 June 2015

Academic Editor: Shi-Wen Jiang

Copyright © 2015 Mu Yuan et al. This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.

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