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BioMed Research International
Volume 2015, Article ID 274852, 10 pages
http://dx.doi.org/10.1155/2015/274852
Research Article

Noncoding RNAs: Possible Players in the Development of Fluorosis

1Environmental Health Division, National Environmental Engineering Research Institute (NEERI), CSIR, Nagpur 440020, India
2Department of Health Sciences, University of Genoa, No. 5, 16126 Genoa, Italy
3IRCCS AOU San Martino IST, No. 10, 16132 Genoa, Italy
4CNR Institute for Macromolecular Studies, No. 6, 16149 Genoa, Italy
5Environmental Genomics Division, National Environmental Engineering Research Institute (NEERI), CSIR, Nagpur 440020, India
6Developmental Toxicology, Indian Institute of Toxicology Research, Lucknow 226001, India

Received 10 October 2014; Accepted 4 February 2015

Academic Editor: Luciana dos Reis Vasques

Copyright © 2015 Atul P. Daiwile et al. This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.

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