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BioMed Research International
Volume 2015 (2015), Article ID 293408, 6 pages
http://dx.doi.org/10.1155/2015/293408
Research Article

Heterogeneity of Genetic Damage in Cervical Nuclei and Lymphocytes in Women with Different Levels of Dysplasia and Cancer-Associated Risk Factors

1Cellular and Molecular Biology Department, Guadalajara University, Juarez 976, Colonia Centro, 44100 Guadalajara, JAL, Mexico
2Unit of Medical and Pharmaceutical Biotechnology, CIATEJ, Avenida Normalistas 800, Colinas de la Normal, 44270 Guadalajara, JAL, Mexico
3Dysplasias Unit, Institute of Cancerology Jaliscience, General Coronado 515, Colonia Centro, 44100 Guadalajara, JAL, Mexico
4Mastitis and Molecular Diagnosis, Guadalajara University, Juarez 976, Colonia Centro, 44100 Guadalajara, JAL, Mexico

Received 7 November 2014; Revised 12 February 2015; Accepted 9 March 2015

Academic Editor: Alessandra Pulliero

Copyright © 2015 Carlos Alvarez-Moya et al. This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.

Abstract

The comet assay can be used to assess genetic damage, but heterogeneity in the length of the tails is frequently observed. The aims of this study were to evaluate genetic damage and heterogeneity in the cervical nuclei and lymphocytes from patients with different levels of dysplasia and to determine the risk factors associated with the development of cervical cancer. The study included 97 females who presented with different levels of dysplasia. A comet assay was performed in peripheral blood lymphocytes and cervical epithelial cells. Significant genetic damage () was observed only in patients diagnosed with nuclei cervical from dysplasia III (NCDIII) and lymphocytes from dysplasia I (LDI). However, the standard deviations of the tail lengths in the cervical nuclei and lymphocytes from patients with dysplasia I were significantly different () from the standard deviations of the tail lengths in the nuclei cervical and lymphocytes from patients with DII and DIII (NCDII, NCDIII and LDII, LDIII), indicating a high heterogeneity in tail length. Results suggest that genetic damage could be widely present but only manifested as increased tail length in certain cell populations. This heterogeneity could obscure the statistical significance of the genetic damage.