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BioMed Research International
Volume 2015, Article ID 317465, 11 pages
http://dx.doi.org/10.1155/2015/317465
Review Article

Advances in Anti-IgE Therapy

1Internal Medicine, Allergy and Clinical Immunology, Near East University, Northern Cyprus, Mersin 10, Turkey
2Genomics Research Center, Academia Sinica, Taipei, Taiwan
3Antalya Education Research Hospital, Antalya, Turkey

Received 22 July 2014; Accepted 6 November 2014

Academic Editor: Edinéia Lemos de Andrade

Copyright © 2015 Arzu Didem Yalcin. This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.

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