Table of Contents Author Guidelines Submit a Manuscript
BioMed Research International
Volume 2015 (2015), Article ID 438908, 14 pages
http://dx.doi.org/10.1155/2015/438908
Review Article

Cognitive Interventions in Older Persons: Do They Change the Functioning of the Brain?

1Department of Medical Psychology, Elkerliek Hospital, Wesselmanlaan 25, 5507 HA Helmond, Netherlands
2School for Mental Health and Neuroscience, Alzheimer Centre Limburg, Department of Psychiatry and Neuropsychology, Maastricht University, P.O. Box 616, 6200 MD Maastricht, Netherlands

Received 13 February 2015; Revised 5 May 2015; Accepted 18 May 2015

Academic Editor: Emmanuel Moyse

Copyright © 2015 Yindee van Os et al. This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.

Linked References

  1. Y. Stern, “What is cognitive reserve? Theory and research application of the reserve concept,” Journal of the International Neuropsychological Society, vol. 8, no. 3, pp. 448–460, 2002. View at Publisher · View at Google Scholar · View at Scopus
  2. N. Raz, “Aging of the brain and its impact on cognitive performance: integration of structural and functional findings,” in The Handbook of Aging and Cognition, F. I. M. Craik and T. A. Salthouse, Eds., Lawrence Erlbaum Associates, Mahwah, NJ, USA, 2000. View at Google Scholar
  3. E. M. Hoogenhout, R. H. M. de Groot, and J. Jolles, “A new comprehensive educational group program for older adults with cognitive complaints: background, content, and process evaluation,” Educational Gerontology, vol. 37, no. 1, pp. 51–73, 2011. View at Publisher · View at Google Scholar · View at Scopus
  4. E. M. Hoogenhout, R. H. M. de Groot, W. van der Elst, and J. Jolles, “Effects of a comprehensive educational group intervention in older women with cognitive complaints: a randomized controlled trial,” Aging & Mental Health, vol. 16, no. 2, pp. 135–144, 2012. View at Publisher · View at Google Scholar · View at Scopus
  5. N. L. Hill, A. M. Kolanowski, and D. J. Gill, “Plasticity in early alzheimer disease: an apportunity for intervention,” Topics in Geriatric Rehabilitation, vol. 27, no. 4, pp. 257–267, 2011. View at Publisher · View at Google Scholar · View at Scopus
  6. M. E. M. Mol, M. P. J. van Boxtel, D. Willems, F. R. J. Verhey, and J. Jolles, “Subjective forgetfulness is associated with lower quality of life in middle-aged and young-old individuals: a 9-year follow-up in older participants from the Maastricht Aging Study,” Aging and Mental Health, vol. 13, no. 5, pp. 699–705, 2009. View at Publisher · View at Google Scholar · View at Scopus
  7. A. Bahar-Fuchs, L. Clare, and B. Woods, “Cognitive training and cognitive rehabilitation for mild to moderate Alzheimer's disease and vascular dementia,” The Cochrane Database of Systematic Reviews, vol. 6, Article ID CD003260, 2013. View at Google Scholar · View at Scopus
  8. V. Buschert, A. L. W. Bokde, and H. Hampel, “Cognitive intervention in Alzheimer disease,” Nature Reviews Neurology, vol. 6, no. 9, pp. 508–517, 2010. View at Publisher · View at Google Scholar · View at Scopus
  9. B. Woods, E. Aguirre, A. E. Spector, and M. Orrell, “Cognitive stimulation to improve cognitive functioning in people with dementia,” The Cochrane Database of Systematic Reviews, no. 2, Article ID CD005562, 2012. View at Google Scholar · View at Scopus
  10. D. E. J. Linden, “How psychotherapy changes the brain—the contribution of functional neuroimaging,” Molecular Psychiatry, vol. 11, no. 6, pp. 528–538, 2006. View at Publisher · View at Google Scholar · View at Scopus
  11. H. Li, J. Li, N. Li, B. Li, P. Wang, and T. Zhou, “Cognitive intervention for persons with mild cognitive impairment: a meta-analysis,” Ageing Research Reviews, vol. 10, no. 2, pp. 285–296, 2011. View at Publisher · View at Google Scholar · View at Scopus
  12. S. A. H. van Hooren, S. A. M. Valentijn, H. Bosma et al., “Effect of a structured course involving goal management training in older adults: a randomised controlled trial,” Patient Education and Counseling, vol. 65, no. 2, pp. 205–213, 2007. View at Publisher · View at Google Scholar · View at Scopus
  13. S. A. M. Valentijn, S. A. H. Van Hooren, H. Bosma et al., “The effect of two types of memory training on subjective and objective memory performance in healthy individuals aged 55 years and older: a randomized controlled trial,” Patient Education and Counseling, vol. 57, no. 1, pp. 106–114, 2005. View at Publisher · View at Google Scholar · View at Scopus
  14. Y. Kondo, M. Suzuki, S. Mugikura et al., “Changes in brain activation associated with use of a memory strategy: a functional MRI study,” NeuroImage, vol. 24, no. 4, pp. 1154–1163, 2005. View at Publisher · View at Google Scholar · View at Scopus
  15. S. Belleville and L. Bherer, “Biomarkers of cognitive training effects in aging,” Current Translational Geriatrics and Experimental Gerontology Reports, vol. 1, no. 2, pp. 104–110, 2012. View at Publisher · View at Google Scholar
  16. A. C. Rosen, L. Sugiura, J. H. Kramer, S. Whitfield-Gabrieli, and J. D. Gabrieli, “Cognitive training changes hippocampal function in mild cognitive impairment: a pilot study,” Journal of Alzheimer's Disease, vol. 26, no. 3, pp. 349–357, 2011. View at Publisher · View at Google Scholar · View at Scopus
  17. J. J. Palop, J. Chin, and L. Mucke, “A network dysfunction perspective on neurodegenerative diseases,” Nature, vol. 443, no. 7113, pp. 768–773, 2006. View at Publisher · View at Google Scholar · View at Scopus
  18. M. J. Valenzuela, M. Jones, W. Wen et al., “Memory training alters hippocampal neurochemistry in healthy elderly,” NeuroReport, vol. 14, no. 10, pp. 1333–1337, 2003. View at Publisher · View at Google Scholar · View at Scopus
  19. D. Bartrés-Faz and E. M. Arenaza-Urquijo, “Structural and functional imaging correlates of cognitive and brain reserve hypotheses in healthy and pathological aging,” Brain Topography, vol. 24, no. 3-4, pp. 340–357, 2011. View at Publisher · View at Google Scholar · View at Scopus
  20. G. W. Small, D. H. S. Silverman, P. Siddarth et al., “Effects of a 14-day healthy longevity lifestyle program on cognition and brain function,” American Journal of Geriatric Psychiatry, vol. 14, no. 6, pp. 538–545, 2006. View at Publisher · View at Google Scholar · View at Scopus
  21. K. I. Erickson, S. J. Colcombe, R. Wadhwa et al., “Training-induced plasticity in older adults: effects of training on hemispheric asymmetry,” Neurobiology of Aging, vol. 28, no. 2, pp. 272–283, 2007. View at Publisher · View at Google Scholar · View at Scopus
  22. Y. Brehmer, A. Rieckmann, M. Bellander, H. Westerberg, H. Fischer, and L. Bäckman, “Neural correlates of training-related working-memory gains in old age,” NeuroImage, vol. 58, no. 4, pp. 1110–1120, 2011. View at Publisher · View at Google Scholar · View at Scopus
  23. S. Belleville, S. Mellah, C. de Boysson, J. Demonet, B. Bier, and L. Chao, “The pattern and loci of training-induced brain changes in healthy older adults are predicted by the nature of the intervention,” PLoS ONE, vol. 9, no. 8, Article ID e102710, 2014. View at Publisher · View at Google Scholar
  24. B. M. Hampstead, A. Y. Stringer, R. F. Stilla, M. Giddens, and K. Sathian, “Mnemonic strategy training partially restores hippocampal activity in patients with mild cognitive impairment,” Hippocampus, vol. 22, no. 8, pp. 1652–1658, 2012. View at Publisher · View at Google Scholar · View at Scopus
  25. W.-D. Heiss, J. Kessler, R. Mielke, B. Szelies, and K. Herholz, “Long-term effects of phosphatidylserine, pyritinol, and cognitive training in Alzheimer's disease. A neuropsychological, EEG, and PET investigation,” Dementia, vol. 5, no. 2, pp. 88–98, 1994. View at Google Scholar · View at Scopus
  26. K. Akanuma, K. Meguro, M. Meguro et al., “Improved social interaction and increased anterior cingulate metabolism after group reminiscence with reality orientation approach for vascular dementia,” Psychiatry Research: Neuroimaging, vol. 192, no. 3, pp. 183–187, 2011. View at Publisher · View at Google Scholar · View at Scopus
  27. S. Förster, V. C. Buschert, H.-G. Buchholz et al., “Effects of a 6-month cognitive intervention program on brain metabolism in amnestic mild cognitive impairment and mild Alzheimer's disease,” Journal of Alzheimer's Disease, vol. 25, no. 4, pp. 695–706, 2011. View at Publisher · View at Google Scholar · View at Scopus
  28. J. van Paasschen, L. Clare, K. S. L. Yuen et al., “Cognitive rehabilitation changes memory-related brain activity in people with Alzheimer disease,” Neurorehabilitation and Neural Repair, vol. 27, no. 5, pp. 448–459, 2013. View at Publisher · View at Google Scholar · View at Scopus
  29. F. Baglio, L. Griffanti, F. L. Saibene et al., “Multistimulation group therapy in Alzheimer's disease promotes changes in brain functioning,” Neurorehabilitation and Neural Repair, vol. 29, no. 1, pp. 13–24, 2014. View at Publisher · View at Google Scholar
  30. L. Nyberg, J. Sandblom, S. Jones et al., “Neural correlates of training-related memory improvement in adulthood and aging,” Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences of the United States of America, vol. 100, no. 23, pp. 13728–13733, 2003. View at Publisher · View at Google Scholar · View at Scopus
  31. L. Clare, J. van Paasschen, S. J. Evans, C. Parkinson, R. T. Woods, and D. E. J. Linden, “Goal-oriented cognitive rehabilitation for an individual with Mild Cognitive Impairment: behavioural and neuroimaging outcomes,” Neurocase: The Neural Basis of Cognition, vol. 15, no. 4, pp. 318–331, 2009. View at Publisher · View at Google Scholar · View at Scopus
  32. B. M. Hampstead, A. Y. Stringer, R. F. Stilla et al., “Activation and effective connectivity changes following explicit-memory training for face-name pairs in patients with mild cognitive impairment: a pilot study,” Neurorehabilitation and Neural Repair, vol. 25, no. 3, pp. 210–222, 2011. View at Publisher · View at Google Scholar · View at Scopus
  33. S. Belleville, F. Clément, S. Mellah, B. Gilbert, F. Fontaine, and S. Gauthier, “Training-related brain plasticity in subjects at risk of developing Alzheimer's disease,” Brain, vol. 134, no. 6, pp. 1623–1634, 2011. View at Publisher · View at Google Scholar · View at Scopus
  34. M. Nagaya, H. Endo, T. Kachi, Y. Abe, and T. Ota, “Recreational rehabilitation improved cognitive function in vascular dementia,” Journal of the American Geriatrics Society, vol. 53, no. 5, pp. 911–912, 2005. View at Publisher · View at Google Scholar · View at Scopus
  35. K. Tanaka, Y. Yamada, Y. Kobayashi et al., “Improved cognitive function, mood and brain blood flow in single photon emission computed tomography following individual reminiscence therapy in an elderly patient with Alzheimer's disease,” Geriatrics & Gerontology International, vol. 7, no. 3, pp. 305–309, 2007. View at Publisher · View at Google Scholar
  36. C. Spironelli, S. Bergamaschi, S. Mondini, D. Villani, and A. Angrilli, “Functional plasticity in Alzheimer's disease: effect of cognitive training on language-related ERP components,” Neuropsychologia, vol. 51, no. 8, pp. 1638–1648, 2013. View at Publisher · View at Google Scholar · View at Scopus
  37. C. Lustig, P. Shah, R. Seidler, and P. A. Lustig-Lorenz, “Aging, training, and the brain: a review and future directions,” Neuropsychology Review, vol. 19, no. 4, pp. 504–522, 2009. View at Publisher · View at Google Scholar · View at Scopus