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BioMed Research International
Volume 2015, Article ID 453801, 8 pages
http://dx.doi.org/10.1155/2015/453801
Review Article

Heparan Sulfate Proteoglycans May Promote or Inhibit Cancer Progression by Interacting with Integrins and Affecting Cell Migration

1Instituto de Bioquímica Médica, Universidade Federal do Rio de Janeiro, 21941-913 Rio de Janeiro, RJ, Brazil
2Serviço de Patologia, Hospital Naval Marcílio Dias, 20725-090 Rio de Janeiro, RJ, Brazil
3Hospital Naval Marcílio Dias, Instituto de Pesquisas Biomédicas, 20725-090 Rio de Janeiro, RJ, Brazil

Received 6 June 2015; Revised 28 August 2015; Accepted 28 September 2015

Academic Editor: Katalin Dobra

Copyright © 2015 Mariana A. Soares et al. This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.

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