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BioMed Research International
Volume 2015, Article ID 587247, 9 pages
http://dx.doi.org/10.1155/2015/587247
Research Article

The Rapid Inactivation of Porcine Skin by Applying High Hydrostatic Pressure without Damaging the Extracellular Matrix

1Department of Plastic and Reconstructive Surgery, Kansai Medical University, 2-5-1 Shinmachi, Hirakata, Osaka 573-1010, Japan
2Department of Biomedical Engineering, National Cerebral and Cardiovascular Center Research Institute, Fujishirodai, Suita, Osaka 565-8565, Japan
3Department of Biomedical Engineering, Osaka Institute of Technology, 5-16-1 Omiya, Asahi-ku, Osaka 535-8585, Japan
4Department of Plastic and Reconstructive Surgery, Graduate School of Medicine, Kyoto University, Kyoto 606-8507, Japan

Received 13 November 2014; Revised 13 March 2015; Accepted 15 March 2015

Academic Editor: Aijun Wang

Copyright © 2015 Naoki Morimoto et al. This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.

Abstract

We previously reported that high hydrostatic pressure (HHP) of 200 MPa for 10 minutes could induce cell killing. In this study, we explored whether HHP at 200 MPa or HHP at lower pressure, in combination with hyposmotic distilled water (DW), could inactivate the skin, as well as cultured cells. We investigated the inactivation of porcine skin samples 4 mm in diameter. They were immersed in either a normal saline solution (NSS) or DW, and then were pressurized at 100 and 200 MPa for 5, 10, 30, or 60 min. Next, we explored the inactivation of specimens punched out from the pressurized skin 10 × 2 cm in size. The viability was evaluated using a WST-8 assay and an outgrowth culture. The histology of specimens was analyzed histologically. The mitochondrial activity was inactivated after the pressurization at 200 MPa in both experiments, and no outgrowth was observed after the pressurization at 200 MPa. The arrangement and proportion of the dermal collagen fibers or the elastin fibers were not adversely affected after the pressurization at 200 MPa for up to 60 minutes. This study showed that a HHP at 200 MPa for 10 min could inactivate the skin without damaging the dermal matrix.