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BioMed Research International
Volume 2015, Article ID 587983, 13 pages
http://dx.doi.org/10.1155/2015/587983
Review Article

Environmental Epigenetics: Crossroad between Public Health, Lifestyle, and Cancer Prevention

Laboratory of Tumor Epigenetics, IRCCS AOU San Martino-IST, Largo Rosanna Benzi 10, 16132 Genova, Italy

Received 14 January 2015; Accepted 1 April 2015

Academic Editor: Jia Cao

Copyright © 2015 Massimo Romani et al. This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.

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