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BioMed Research International
Volume 2015 (2015), Article ID 613910, 11 pages
http://dx.doi.org/10.1155/2015/613910
Research Article

Evolutionary Pattern and Regulation Analysis to Support Why Diversity Functions Existed within PPAR Gene Family Members

1Key Lab of Sichuan Province, Institute of Animal Genetics and Breeding, Sichuan Agricultural University, Ya’an, Sichuan 625014, China
2College of Animal Science and Technology, Sichuan Agricultural University, Ya’an, Sichuan 625014, China

Received 30 June 2014; Accepted 4 November 2014

Academic Editor: Ryuji Hamamoto

Copyright © 2015 Tianyu Zhou et al. This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.

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