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BioMed Research International
Volume 2015 (2015), Article ID 790203, 10 pages
http://dx.doi.org/10.1155/2015/790203
Review Article

Hyaluronan’s Role in Fibrosis: A Pathogenic Factor or a Passive Player?

Department of Pathobiology, Cleveland Clinic Lerner Research Institute, 9500 Euclid Avenue, Cleveland, OH 44195, USA

Received 13 April 2015; Accepted 25 May 2015

Academic Editor: Spyros S. Skandalis

Copyright © 2015 Sami Albeiroti et al. This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.

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