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BioMed Research International
Volume 2015, Article ID 798768, 16 pages
http://dx.doi.org/10.1155/2015/798768
Review Article

Atrial Fibrillation and Fibrosis: Beyond the Cardiomyocyte Centric View

1Centre of Excellence for Toxicological Research, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, University of Parma, Via Gramsci 14, 43126 Parma, Italy
2Humanitas Clinical and Research Centre, Via Manzoni 56, Rozzano, 20090 Milan, Italy
3Department of Cardiovascular Sciences, National Heart and Lung Institute, Imperial Centre for Translational and Experimental Medicine, Hammersmith Campus, Imperial College London, Du Cane Road, London W12 0NN, UK

Received 31 December 2014; Revised 27 March 2015; Accepted 30 March 2015

Academic Editor: Rei Shibata

Copyright © 2015 Michele Miragoli and Alexey V. Glukhov. This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.

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