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BioMed Research International
Volume 2015, Article ID 817595, 23 pages
http://dx.doi.org/10.1155/2015/817595
Research Article

Cortical Structural Connectivity Alterations in Primary Insomnia: Insights from MRI-Based Morphometric Correlation Analysis

1McConnell Brain Imaging Centre, Montreal Neurological Institute, McGill University, Montreal, QC, Canada H3A 2B4
2Department of Radiology, Henan Provincial People’s Hospital, People’s Hospital of Zhengzhou University, Henan 450003, China
3Douglas Mental Health University Institute, McGill University, Montreal, QC, Canada H4H 1R3
4Department of Neurology, Henan Provincial People’s Hospital, People’s Hospital of Zhengzhou University, Henan 450003, China
5MRI Division, First Affiliated Hospital of Zhengzhou University, Zhengzhou, Henan 450052, China

Received 23 March 2015; Revised 25 May 2015; Accepted 28 May 2015

Academic Editor: Enzo Terreno

Copyright © 2015 Lu Zhao et al. This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.

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