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BioMed Research International
Volume 2015, Article ID 946787, 24 pages
http://dx.doi.org/10.1155/2015/946787
Review Article

Trichomonas vaginalis Cysteine Proteinases: Iron Response in Gene Expression and Proteolytic Activity

1Departamento de Infectómica y Patogénesis Molecular, Centro de Investigación y de Estudios Avanzados del Instituto Politécnico Nacional (CINVESTAV-IPN), Avenida IPN 2508, Colonia San Pedro Zacatenco, 07360 México, DF, Mexico
2Departamento de Biotecnología y Bioingeniería, Centro de Investigación y de Estudios Avanzados del Instituto Politécnico Nacional (CINVESTAV-IPN), Avenida IPN 2508, Colonia San Pedro Zacatenco, 07360 México, DF, Mexico

Received 15 November 2014; Accepted 9 March 2015

Academic Editor: Amogh A. Sahasrabuddhe

Copyright © 2015 Rossana Arroyo et al. This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.

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