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BioMed Research International
Volume 2015, Article ID 954901, 11 pages
http://dx.doi.org/10.1155/2015/954901
Review Article

From Cerebellar Activation and Connectivity to Cognition: A Review of the Quadrato Motor Training

1The Leslie and Susan Gonda (Goldschmied) Multidisciplinary Brain Research Center, Bar-Ilan University, Ramat Gan, Israel
2Research Institute for Neuroscience, Education and Didactics, Patrizio Paoletti Foundation, Rome, Italy
3Department of Criminology, Bar-Ilan University, Ramat Gan, Israel
4Department of Neurobiology, Weizmann Institute of Science, Rehovot, Israel
5Department of Physiology and Pharmacology, University of Rome “La Sapienza”, Rome, Italy

Received 13 February 2015; Accepted 6 May 2015

Academic Editor: Ni Shu

Copyright © 2015 Tal Dotan Ben-Soussan et al. This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.

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