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Review Article
BioMed Research International
VolumeĀ 2015, Article IDĀ 969257, 2 pages
http://dx.doi.org/10.1155/2015/969257
Corrigendum

Corrigendum to “Evaluating the Importance of the Carotid Chemoreceptors in Controlling Breathing during Exercise in Man”

School of Sport, Exercise & Rehabilitation Sciences, University of Birmingham, Edgbaston, Birmingham B15 2TT, UK

Received 18 June 2015; Accepted 25 June 2015

Copyright © 2015 M. J. Parkes. This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.


In the paper titled “Evaluating the Importance of the Carotid Chemoreceptors in Controlling Breathing during Exercise in Man,” please note that in Figure (a) the top scale should read as follows: Equivalent altitude (k ft) calculated by Dripps (and not km).

Figure 4: (a) Relative insensitivity of breathing at rest to artificially lowering PO2 in Man. Minute ventilation (± se solid bars, ± sd open bars) in normal subjects as inspired oxygen is artificially lowered (strictly hypocapnic hypoxia exists once hyperventilation occurs). Equivalent PaO2 points are aligned on the FiO2 scale, with PaO2 estimated before hyperventilation occurs using the alveolar gas equation (assuming 760 mmHg barometric pressure, RQ = 0.8, PaO2 = PAO2, and PaCO2 = PACO2), and the point afterwards is estimated based on dynamic forcing experiments in isocapnia (courtesy of Dr. G. A. Balanos). Reproduced with permission from Dripps et al., . (b) Sensitivity of breathing at rest to artificially raising PaCO2 in Man. Minute ventilation and PaCO2 (femoral) in 8 healthy men while inhaling 0–6% CO2 in air at atmospheric pressure (mean slope is 2.5 L·min−1 mmHg−1 artificial PaCO2 rise). Reproduced with permission from Lambertsen et al. .